nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

jaynajaynajayna:

I swear I need to get rich soon so I can really build my own Dymaxion House - before IKEA does.
Only two prototypes of this were ever made. Buckminster Fuller (inventor of the geodesic dome, rowing needles, and the dymaxion map) sought “to make the world work for 100% of humanity in the shortest possible time through spontaneous cooperation without ecological offense or disadvantage to anyone.” The house would be factory made, its parts easy (cheap) to mass produce, making it very affordable (cheap) to many consumers, very easy (cheap) to ship, (the Dymaxion House’s collective parts weighed 3,000lbs, about 1/10th of a contemporary home’s weight) and all of the parts would be prefabricated, and easy to assemble - the house would take 6 people only one day to assemble once it was shipped.
He aimed for the houses to be environmentally efficient, and easy for a post WWII America to produce, as they could be made in retiring aircraft factories from aluminum, ideal for the home as it was light, durable, strong, and would have needed very little upkeep.
Bucky’s dream (or one of them, anyway) was never realized as his investors were eager to have the houses mass produced and available for returning WWII vets to purchase - he wanted to continue to refine the design, and refused any further production progress.

I know how long it takes me to assemble a dining room table, so I doubt six laymen could have actually assembled the whole thing in a day, but it’s a pretty beautiful idea. It was conceived in 1926, and still manages to sound “futuristic.”

reblogging myself because I like cool stuff.

jaynajaynajayna:

I swear I need to get rich soon so I can really build my own Dymaxion House - before IKEA does.

Only two prototypes of this were ever made. Buckminster Fuller (inventor of the geodesic dome, rowing needles, and the dymaxion map) sought “to make the world work for 100% of humanity in the shortest possible time through spontaneous cooperation without ecological offense or disadvantage to anyone.” The house would be factory made, its parts easy (cheap) to mass produce, making it very affordable (cheap) to many consumers, very easy (cheap) to ship, (the Dymaxion House’s collective parts weighed 3,000lbs, about 1/10th of a contemporary home’s weight) and all of the parts would be prefabricated, and easy to assemble - the house would take 6 people only one day to assemble once it was shipped.

He aimed for the houses to be environmentally efficient, and easy for a post WWII America to produce, as they could be made in retiring aircraft factories from aluminum, ideal for the home as it was light, durable, strong, and would have needed very little upkeep.

Bucky’s dream (or one of them, anyway) was never realized as his investors were eager to have the houses mass produced and available for returning WWII vets to purchase - he wanted to continue to refine the design, and refused any further production progress.

image

I know how long it takes me to assemble a dining room table, so I doubt six laymen could have actually assembled the whole thing in a day, but it’s a pretty beautiful idea. It was conceived in 1926, and still manages to sound “futuristic.”

reblogging myself because I like cool stuff.

A bill that would require craft brewers to sell their suds to a beer distributor and make them buy it back to sell at their own breweries has cleared a Senate panel.
 
The measure (SB 1714) has so infuriated craft brewers and beer enthusiasts that some on Twitter have christened it with the hashtag “#growlergate.” The Community Affairs committee approved the bill Tuesday.
 
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, was so incensed at the idea of craft brewers having to pay someone else to sell their own product that he likened it to a mobbed-up racket. Latvala has championed the microbrewery cause.
 
The requirement is similar to paying “protection to ‘Vinnie’ in New York,” he said.
 
The bill also is favored by the Big Beer lobby, which is feeling the heat from craft beer’s competition.